DSpace Kyoto University
Japanese | English 

Kyoto University Research Information Repository >
Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics >
Journal Articles >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/163491

Full text link:

File Description SizeFormat
0004-637X760156.pdf1.21 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: INTERDEPENDENCE OF ELECTRIC DISCHARGE AND MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS
Authors: Muranushi, Takayuki
Okuzumi, Satoshi
Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro
Author's alias: 村主, 崇行
Keywords: instabilities
magnetohydrodynamics (MHD)
planets and satellites: formation
protoplanetary disks
Issue Date: Nov-2012
Publisher: IOP Publishing
Journal title: The Astrophysical Journal
Volume: 760
Issue: 1
Thesis number: 56
DOI: 10.1088/0004-637X/760/1/56
Abstract: We study how the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in protoplanetary disks is affected by the electric discharge caused by the electric field in the resistive magnetohydrodynamic. We performed three-dimensional shearing box simulations with various values of plasma beta and electrical breakdown models. We find that the MRI is self-sustaining in spite of the high resistivity. The instability gives rise to the large electric field that causes the electrical breakdown, and the breakdown maintains the high degree of ionization required for the instability. The condition for this self-sustained MRI is set by the balance between the energy supply from the shearing motion and the energy consumed by ohmic dissipation. We apply the condition to various disk models and study where the active, self-sustained, and dead zones of MRI are located. In the fiducial minimum-mass solar-nebula model, the newly found sustained zone occupies only a limited volume of the disk. In the late-phase gas-depleted disk models, however, the sustained zone occupies a larger volume of the disk.
Rights: © 2012. The American Astronomical Society.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/163491
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles


Export to RefWorks

Access count of this item: 22

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2006 MIT and Hewlett-Packard - Feedback - Privacy policy