Downloads: 589

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
rstb.2011.0016.pdf242.27 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: Induced pluripotent stem cells: opportunities and challenges.
Authors: Okita, Keisuke  kyouindb  KAKEN_id  orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5806-1090 (unconfirmed)
Yamanaka, Shinya  kyouindb  KAKEN_id
Author's alias: 沖田, 圭介
山中, 伸弥
Issue Date: 12-Aug-2011
Publisher: The Royal Society
Journal title: Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
Volume: 366
Start page: 2183
End page: 2197
Abstract: Somatic cells have been reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells by introducing a combination of several transcription factors, such as Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from a patient's somatic cells could be a useful source for drug discovery and cell transplantation therapies. However, most human iPS cells are made by viral vectors, such as retrovirus and lentivirus, which integrate the reprogramming factors into the host genomes and may increase the risk of tumour formation. Several non-integration methods have been reported to overcome the safety concern associated with the generation of iPS cells, such as transient expression of the reprogramming factors using adenovirus vectors or plasmids, and direct delivery of reprogramming proteins. Although these transient expression methods could avoid genomic alteration of iPS cells, they are inefficient. Several studies of gene expression, epigenetic modification and differentiation revealed the insufficient reprogramming of iPS cells, thus suggesting the need for improvement of the reprogramming procedure not only in quantity but also in quality. This report will summarize the current knowledge of iPS generation and discuss future reprogramming methods for medical application.
Rights: © 2011 The Royal Society
この論文は出版社版でありません。引用の際には出版社版をご確認ご利用ください。
This is not the published version. Please cite only the published version.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/143687
DOI(Published Version): 10.1098/rstb.2011.0016
PubMed ID: 21727125
Related Link: http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/366/1575/2198
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

Show full item record

Export to RefWorks


Export Format: 


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.