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Title: Disseminated Nocardia farcinica infection in a patient with myasthenia gravis successfully treated by linezolid: a case report and literature review.
Authors: Tanioka, Kosuke
Nagao, Miki  kyouindb  KAKEN_id  orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8886-6145 (unconfirmed)
Yamamoto, Masaki  kyouindb  KAKEN_id
Matsumura, Yasufumi  kyouindb  KAKEN_id  orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8595-8944 (unconfirmed)
Tabu, Hayato
Matsushima, Aki  kyouindb  KAKEN_id
Uemura, Kengo
Matsumoto, Riki  kyouindb  KAKEN_id  orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3985-9210 (unconfirmed)
Ito, Yutaka
Takakura, Shunji  kyouindb  KAKEN_id
Takahashi, Ryosuke  kyouindb  KAKEN_id
Ichiyama, Satoshi  kyouindb  KAKEN_id
Author's alias: 長尾, 美紀
Keywords: Invasive nocardiosis
Linezolid
Nocardia farcinica
Issue Date: Jun-2012
Publisher: Springer Japan
Journal title: Journal of infection and chemotherapy : official journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy
Volume: 18
Issue: 3
Start page: 390
End page: 394
Abstract: Nocardiosis is increasingly being diagnosed because of a growing population of immunocompromised hosts and improvements in the detection of Nocardia species in clinical laboratories. Historically, sulphonamides have been the first-line therapy for the treatment of nocardiosis, but sulphonamides tend to have a high rate of drug allergy in clinical settings. In this report, we described a disseminated Nocardia farcinica infection that occurred in a patient with myasthenia gravis who suffered from multiple drug allergies and was successfully treated using linezolid. We undertook a review of the literature of previously reported cases of nocardiosis treated with linezolid. To date, only 15 cases of nocardiosis treated with linezolid have been published. All cases exhibited long-term tolerance of linezolid, and 14 of 15 cases showed either an improvement in or complete clearance of the infection. According to the literature review, linezolid is an attractive alternative to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for the treatment of disseminated nocardiosis, despite limited clinical evidence to support this claim.
Rights: The final publication is available at www.springerlink.com
この論文は出版社版でありません。引用の際には出版社版をご確認ご利用ください。This is not the published version. Please cite only the published version.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/160126
DOI(Published Version): 10.1007/s10156-011-0315-1
PubMed ID: 21997125
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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