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Title: The NEET and Hikikomori spectrum: Assessing the risks and consequences of becoming culturally marginalized.
Authors: Uchida, Yukiko  kyouindb  KAKEN_id  orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8336-2423 (unconfirmed)
Norasakkunkit, Vinai
Author's alias: 内田, 由紀子
Keywords: NEET
Hikikomori
marginalization
culture
risk factors
rating scales
Issue Date: 18-Aug-2015
Publisher: Frontiers
Journal title: Frontiers in psychology
Volume: 6
Thesis number: 1117
Abstract: An increasing number of young people are becoming socially and economically marginalized in Japan under economic stagnation and pressures to be more globally competitive in a post-industrial economy. The phenomena of NEET/Hikikomori (occupational/social withdrawal) have attracted global attention in recent years. Though the behavioral symptoms of NEET and Hikikomori can be differentiated, some commonalities in psychological features can be found. Specifically, we believe that both NEET and Hikikomori show psychological tendencies that deviate from those governed by mainstream cultural attitudes, values, and behaviors, with the difference between NEET and Hikikomori being largely a matter of degree. In this study, we developed a NEET-Hikikomori Risk Factors (NHR) scale that treats NEET/Hikikomori not as a set of distinct diagnoses, but as a spectrum of psychological tendencies associated with the risk of being marginalized in society. Based on this idea, we identified three related risk factors in our NHR spectrum scale: (1) Freeter lifestyle preference, which in Japan refers to the tendency to consciously choose to not work despite job availabilities, (2) a lack of self-competence, and (3) having unclear ambitions for the future (Study 1). Study 2 investigated and confirmed the validity of the scale by examining NHR differences between occupational groups. The results suggested that NHR is related to psychological tendencies common in the marginalized segments of society. The relationship between these psychological tendencies and actually becoming marginalized across cultures is discussed.
Rights: © 2015 Uchida and Norasakkunkit. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/214324
DOI(Published Version): 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01117
PubMed ID: 26347667
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