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Title: Factors associated with the difficulty in hospital acceptance at the scene by emergency medical service personnel: a population-based study in Osaka City, Japan
Authors: Katayama, Yusuke
Kitamura, Tetsuhisa
Kiyohara, Kosuke
Iwami, Taku  kyouindb  KAKEN_id  orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4150-7065 (unconfirmed)
Kawamura, Takashi  kyouindb  KAKEN_id
Hayashida, Sumito
Yoshiya, Kazuhisa
Ogura, Hiroshi
Shimazu, Takeshi
Author's alias: 石見, 拓
川村, 孝
Issue Date: Oct-2016
Publisher: BMJ
Journal title: BMJ Open
Volume: 6
Issue: 10
Thesis number: e013849
Abstract: Objectives To investigate the association between the difficulty in hospital acceptance at the scene by emergency medical service (EMS) personnel and prehospital demographic factors and reasons for EMS calls. Design A retrospective, observational study. Setting Osaka City, Japan. Participants A total of 100 649 patients transported to medical institutions by EMS from January 2013 to December 2013. Primary outcome measurements The definition of difficulty in hospital acceptance at the scene was EMS personnel making ≥5 phone calls to medical institutions until a decision to transport was determined. Multivariable analysis was used to assess the relationship between difficulty in hospital acceptance and prehospital factors and reasons for EMS calls. Results Multivariable analysis showed the elderly, foreigners, loss of consciousness, holiday/weekend, and night-time to be positively associated with difficulty in hospital acceptance at the scene. As reasons for EMS calls, gas poisoning (adjusted OR 3.281, 95% CI 1.201 to 8.965), trauma by assault (adjusted OR 2.662, 95% CI 2.390 to 2.966), self-induced drug abuse/gas poisoning (adjusted OR 4.527, 95% CI 3.921 to 5.228) and self-induced trauma (adjusted OR 1.708, 95% CI 1.369 to 2.130) were positively associated with the difficulty in hospital acceptance at the scene. Conclusions Ambulance records in Osaka City showed that certain prehospital factors such as night-time were positively associated with difficulty in hospital acceptance at the scene, and reasons for EMS calls, such as self-induced drug abuse/gas poisoning, were also positive predictors for difficulty in hospital acceptance at the scene.
Rights: This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/218807
DOI(Published Version): 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013849
Appears in Collections:学術雑誌掲載論文等

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