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Title: Single-neuron and genetic correlates of autistic behavior in macaque
Authors: Yoshida, Kyoko
Go, Yasuhiro
Kushima, Itaru
Toyoda, Atsushi
Fujiyama, Asao
Imai, Hiroo
Saito, Nobuhito
Iriki, Atsushi
Ozaki, Norio
Isoda, Masaki
Author's alias: 今井, 啓雄
Keywords: Autism
behavioral neuroscience
neurons
developmental neuroscience
genomic analysis
Issue Date: 21-Sep-2016
Publisher: American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
Journal title: Science Advances
Volume: 2
Issue: 9
Thesis number: e1600558
Abstract: Atypical neurodevelopment in autism spectrum disorder is a mystery, defying explanation despite increasing attention. We report on a Japanese macaque that spontaneously exhibited autistic traits, namely, impaired social ability as well as restricted and repetitive behaviors, along with our single-neuron and genomic analyses. Its social ability was measured in a turn-taking task, where two monkeys monitor each other’s actions for adaptive behavioral planning. In its brain, the medial frontal neurons responding to others’ actions, abundant in the controls, were almost nonexistent. In its genes, whole-exome sequencing and copy number variation analyses identified rare coding variants linked to human neuropsychiatric disorders in 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor 2C (HTR2C) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)–binding cassette subfamily A13 (ABCA13). This combination of systems neuroscience and cognitive genomics in macaques suggests a new, phenotype-to-genotype approach to studying mental disorders.
Rights: © 2016, The Authors. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial license, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, so long as the resultant use is not for commercial advantage and provided the original work is properly cited.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/224811
DOI(Published Version): 10.1126/sciadv.1600558
PubMed ID: 27679817
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