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Title: Determining the developmental requirements for Hebb repetition learning in young children: Grouping, short-term memory, and their interaction
Authors: Yanaoka, Kaichi
Nakayama, Masataka
Jarrold, Christopher
Saito, Satoru  kyouindb  KAKEN_id  orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0403-3606 (unconfirmed)
Author's alias: 柳岡, 開地
齊藤, 智
Keywords: Linguistics and Language
Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
Language and Linguistics
Issue Date: Apr-2019
Publisher: American Psychological Association (APA)
Journal title: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Volume: 45
Issue: 4
Start page: 573
End page: 590
Abstract: The Hebb repetition paradigm has recently attracted attention as a measure of serial order learning, which underlies word-form learning abilities. Although children are good vocabulary learners, it is surprising that previous Hebb learning studies with young children show rather weak Hebb effects. In this study, we conducted two experiments to identify developmental factors that drive an increase of the size of the Hebb effect in young children. Motivated by evidence from adult work, we focused on an ability to group a sequence into consistent subsequences and on phonological short-term memory (STM) capacity. In Experiment 1 (N = 98), it was shown that 3- to 5-year-old children with high phonological STM capacity showed a Hebb effect, particularly in the later experimental trials. In Experiment 2 (N = 97), temporal grouping of the sequences in 2–2 subsequences further encouraged children with high phonological STM capacity to show the Hebb effect even in the earlier experimental trials and children with low STM capacity to show a trend toward a Hebb effect in the later trials. Moreover, across Experiments 1 and 2 we found robust evidence of transfer of the Hebb effect to recall of new sequences that partially overlapped in item-by-item pairings with the Hebb sequence, indicating that children use consistent grouping strategies when learning above-span Hebb sequences. These findings indicate that phonological STM, grouping consistency, and their interaction are developmental requirements for the Hebb effect to emerge.
Rights: ©American Psychological Association, 2019. This paper is not the copy of record and may not exactly replicate the authoritative document published in the APA journal. Please do not copy or cite without author's permission. The final article is available, upon publication, at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/xlm0000606.
This is not the published version. Please cite only the published version. この論文は出版社版でありません。引用の際には出版社版をご確認ご利用ください。
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/237370
DOI(Published Version): 10.1037/xlm0000606
PubMed ID: 29999397
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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