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Title: Subcellular dynamics of red clover necrotic mosaic virus double-stranded RNAs in infected plant cells
Authors: Takata, Shota
Mise, Kazuyuki  kyouindb  KAKEN_id  orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4348-6023 (unconfirmed)
Takano, Yoshitaka  kyouindb  KAKEN_id  orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1427-1322 (unconfirmed)
Kaido, Masanori  KAKEN_id
Author's alias: 高田, 昌汰
三瀬, 和之
髙野, 義孝
海道, 真典
Keywords: Viral replication complex (VRC)
Movement protein
Positive-strand RNA virus
Dianthovirus
Endoplasmic reticulum
Issue Date: Mar-2022
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Journal title: Virology
Volume: 568
Start page: 126
End page: 139
Abstract: New evidences are emerging to support the importance of viral replication complexes (VRCs) in not only viral replication, but also viral cell-to-cell movement. Currently, how VRCs grow in size and colocalize with viral movement proteins (MPs) remains unclear. Herein, we performed live-cell imaging of red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) dsRNA by using reporter B2-GFP plants. Tiny granules of dsRNA were formed along the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) at an early stage of infection. Importantly, the colocalization of the dsRNA granules with the virus-encoded p27 replication protein showed that these structures are components of VRCs. These granules moved throughout the cytoplasm, driven by the acto–myosin system, and coalesced with each other to form larger aggregates; the MPs were not associated with these processes. Notably, the MPs colocalized preferentially with large dsRNA aggregates, rather than with tiny dsRNA granules, suggesting that the increase in the size of VRCs promotes their colocalization with MPs.
Rights: © 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.
This is an open access article under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/276202
DOI(Published Version): 10.1016/j.virol.2022.01.015
PubMed ID: 35180583
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