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Title: Macroscopic shaping of coordination polymer via crystal–glass phase transformation as monolithic catalyst for efficient catalyst recovery
Authors: Tiyawarakul, Thanakorn
Imyen, Thidarat
Kongpatpanich, Kanokwan
Watcharatpong, Teerat
Horike, Satoshi  kyouindb  KAKEN_id  orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8530-6364 (unconfirmed)
Author's alias: 堀毛, 悟史
Keywords: Phase transitions
Crystalline solids
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Materials
Differential scanning calorimetry
Polymers
Scanning electron microscopy
Esterification
Catalysts and Catalysis
Chemical compounds
Issue Date: Apr-2023
Publisher: AIP Publishing
Journal title: APL Materials
Volume: 11
Issue: 4
Thesis number: 041119
Abstract: To circumvent the difficult processability and recovery of catalytic materials in powder form, we herein report macroscopic shaping of 1D coordination polymer consisting of zinc ions, orthophosphate, and benzimidazole, namely ZnPBIm, motivated by the crystal–glass phase transformation. Glassy ZnPBIm monoliths with different shapes and sizes were prepared via a melt-quench process without using the secondary component. As a heterogeneous acid catalyst, the glassy ZnPBIm monoliths contribute to the esterification of levulinic acid with ethanol at 100 °C with recyclability for at least three consecutive cycles, and over 90% of catalyst mass was recovered. The macroscopic shape of the monoliths was retained after 24 h of reaction. Surface crystallization of glassy ZnPBIm was induced by the presence of water during esterification, and the glass domain serves as a macroscopic support for the crystallized domain.
Rights: © 2023 Author(s).
All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/285086
DOI(Published Version): 10.1063/5.0144603
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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