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Title: THE DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS AND NUTRITIONAL STATUS FOR A HUNTER-GATHERER SOCIETY WITH SOCIAL TRANSITIONS IN SOUTHEASTERN CAMEROON
Authors: HAGINO, Izumi
SATO, Hiroaki
YAMAUCHI, Taro
Keywords: Baka Pygmy
Demographic characteristics
Nutritional status
Child growth
Social transition
Issue Date: Mar-2014
Publisher: The Research Committee for African Area Studies, Kyoto University
Journal title: African study monographs. Supplementary issue.
Volume: 47
Start page: 45
End page: 57
Abstract: Economic development and social transition often influence the health status of local populations. Pygmy hunter-gatherers in central African rainforest had lived in nomadic life, however, their surrounding environment have been changing. This study aimed to assess the transition of nutritional status for local hunter-gatherers societies which faced social transition. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted in 1996 and 2010–2011 for a village of Baka Pygmy in southeastern Cameroon. The census and anthropometric data were collected from all inhabitants. The nutritional statuses were assessed by following ways; (1) BMI classification, (2) Z-score converting for children using CDC/NHANES reference, and (3) Deriving biological parameters for child growth from Preece-Baines model. During 15 years, despite the migrants greatly increased, the number of Baka was decreased and their living areas were become dispersed. However, the mean values of BMI and %fat for adults were proper and unchanged. Children's Z-scores indicated that although their body sizes were smaller than reference population, they had much amount of body weight and muscle for their height. In addition, the onset of growth spurt for children was occurred in moderate ages. These indices indicated that the nutritional status for Baka people was generally good, and that statuses were not changed.
DOI: 10.14989/185102
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/185102
Appears in Collections:47(Bio-social Adaptations of the Baka Hunter-gatherers in African Rainforest)

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