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Title: Evaluation of the potential of doxorubicin loaded microbubbles as a theranostic modality using a murine tumor model.
Authors: Abdalkader, Rodi  orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2824-335X (unconfirmed)
Kawakami, Shigeru
Unga, Johan
Suzuki, Ryo
Maruyama, Kazuo
Yamashita, Fumiyoshi  kyouindb  KAKEN_id  orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3503-8696 (unconfirmed)
Hashida, Mitsuru  kyouindb  KAKEN_id
Author's alias: 橋田, 充
Keywords: Cancer therapy
Doxorubicin loaded microbubbles
Theranostics
Ultrasound
Cavitation
Issue Date: 17-Mar-2015
Publisher: Elsevier Ltd.
Journal title: Acta biomaterialia
Volume: 19
Start page: 112
End page: 118
Abstract: In this study, a novel phospholipid-based microbubble formulation containing doxorubicin and perfluoropropane gas (DLMB) was developed. The DLMBs were prepared by mechanical agitation of a phospholipid dispersion in the presence of perfluoropropane (PFP) gas. An anionic phospholipid, distearoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DSPG) was selected to load doxorubicin in the microbubbles by means of electrostatic interaction. The particle size, zeta potential, echogenicity and stability of the DLMBs were measured. Drug loading was ≥ 92%. The potential of the DLMBs for use as a theranostic modality was evaluated in tumor bearing mice. Gas chromatography analysis of PFP showed significant enhancement of PFP retention when doxorubicin was used at concentrations of 10-82% equivalent to DSPG. The inhibitory effects on the proliferation of B16BL6 melanoma murine cells in vitro were enhanced using a combination of ultrasound (US) irradiation and DLMBs. Moreover, in vivo DLMBs in combination with (US) irradiation significantly inhibited the growth of B16BL6 melanoma tumor in mice. Additionally, US echo imaging showed high contrast enhancement of the DLMBs in the tumor vasculature. These results suggest that DLMBs could serve as US triggered carriers of doxorubicin as well as tumor imaging agents in cancer therapy.
Rights: © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/. NOTICE: this is the author's version of a work that was accepted for publication in [Acta Biomaterialia]. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in [Acta Biomaterialia, Volume 19, Pages 112–118] doi:10.1016/j.actbio.2015.03.014
許諾条件により本文ファイルは2017-03-17に公開.
This is not the published version. Please cite only the published version. この論文は出版社版でありません。引用の際には出版社版をご確認ご利用ください。
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/198724
DOI(Published Version): 10.1016/j.actbio.2015.03.014
PubMed ID: 25795624
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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