Downloads: 76

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
srep11356.pdf604.19 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
Title: Chimpanzees and bonobos differ in intrinsic motivation for tool use
Authors: Koops, Kathelijne
Furuichi, Takeshi  kyouindb  KAKEN_id
Hashimoto, Chie  kyouindb  KAKEN_id
Author's alias: 古市, 剛史
橋本, 千絵
Issue Date: 16-Jun-2015
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Journal title: Scientific Reports
Volume: 5
Thesis number: 11356
Abstract: Tool use in nonhuman apes can help identify the conditions that drove the extraordinary expansion of hominin technology. Chimpanzees and bonobos are our closest living relatives. Whereas chimpanzees are renowned for their tool use, bonobos use few tools and none in foraging. We investigated whether extrinsic (ecological and social opportunities) or intrinsic (predispositions) differences explain this contrast by comparing chimpanzees at Kalinzu (Uganda) and bonobos at Wamba (DRC). We assessed ecological opportunities based on availability of resources requiring tool use. We examined potential opportunities for social learning in immature apes. Lastly, we investigated predispositions by measuring object manipulation and object play. Extrinsic opportunities did not explain the tool use difference, whereas intrinsic predispositions did. Chimpanzees manipulated and played more with objects than bonobos, despite similar levels of solitary and social play. Selection for increased intrinsic motivation to manipulate objects likely also played an important role in the evolution of hominin tool use.
Rights: © 2015 Scientific Reports. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/215733
DOI(Published Version): 10.1038/srep11356
PubMed ID: 26079292
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

Show full item record

Export to RefWorks


Export Format: 


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.