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Title: Resistance to Anti-Angiogenic Therapy in Cancer—Alterations to Anti-VEGF Pathway
Authors: Itatani, Yoshiro  kyouindb  KAKEN_id
Kawada, Kenji
Yamamoto, Takamasa
Sakai, Yoshiharu
Author's alias: 板谷, 喜朗
河田, 健二
坂井, 義治
Keywords: anti-angiogenic therapy
resistance to anti-VEGF
tumor microenvironment
Issue Date: 18-Apr-2018
Publisher: MDPI AG
Journal title: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume: 19
Issue: 4
Thesis number: 1232
Abstract: Anti-angiogenic therapy is one of the promising strategies for many types of solid cancers. Bevacizumab (Avastin), a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A, was approved for the first time as an anti-angiogenic drug for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2004. In addition, the other VEGF pathway inhibitors including small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (sunitinib, sorafenib, and pazopanib), a soluble VEGF decoy receptor (aflibercept), and a humanized monoclonal antibody of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) (ramucirumab) have been approved for cancer therapy. Although many types of VEGF pathway inhibitors can improve survival in most cancer patients, some patients have little or no beneficial effect from them. The primary or acquired resistance towards many oncological drugs, including anti-VEGF inhibitors, is a common problem in cancer treatment. This review summarizes the proposed alternative mechanisms of angiogenesis other than the VEGF pathway. These mechanisms are involved in the development of resistance to anti-VEGF therapies in cancer patients.
Rights: This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/234208
DOI(Published Version): 10.3390/ijms19041232
PubMed ID: 29670046
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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