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Title: Structural diversity across arbuscular mycorrhizal, ectomycorrhizal, and endophytic plant-fungus networks
Authors: Toju, Hirokazu  kyouindb  KAKEN_id  orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3362-3285 (unconfirmed)
Sato, Hirotoshi  kyouindb  KAKEN_id
Yamamoto, Satoshi
Tanabe, Akifumi S.
Author's alias: 東樹, 宏和
佐藤, 博俊
山本, 哲史
田邉, 晶史
Keywords: Biodiversity
Community ecology
Competitive exclusion
Host specificity or preference
Latitudinal gradients
Microbiomes
Plant-fungus interactions
Plant-soil feedback
Species coexistence
Mycorrhizal and endophytic symbiosis
Issue Date: 21-Nov-2018
Publisher: Springer Nature America, Inc
Journal title: BMC Plant Biology
Volume: 18
Thesis number: 292
Abstract: Background: Below-ground linkage between plant and fungal communities is one of the major drivers of terrestrial ecosystem dynamics. However, we still have limited knowledge of how such plant-fungus associations vary in their community-scale properties depending on fungal functional groups and geographic locations. Methods: By compiling a high-throughput sequencing dataset of root-associated fungi in eight forests along the Japanese Archipelago, we performed a comparative analysis of arbuscular mycorrhizal, ectomycorrhizal, and saprotrophic/endophytic associations across a latitudinal gradient from cool-temperate to subtropical regions. Results: In most of the plant-fungus networks analyzed, host-symbiont associations were significantly specialized but lacked "nested" architecture, which has been commonly reported in plant-pollinator and plant-seed disperser networks. In particular, the entire networks involving all functional groups of plants and fungi and partial networks consisting of ectomycorrhizal plant and fungal species/taxa displayed "anti-nested" architecture (i.e., negative nestedness scores) in many of the forests examined. Our data also suggested that geographic factors affected the organization of plant-fungus network structure. For example, the southernmost subtropical site analyzed in this study displayed lower network-level specificity of host-symbiont associations and higher (but still low) nestedness than northern localities. Conclusions: Our comparative analyses suggest that arbuscular mycorrhizal, ectomycorrhizal, and saprotrophic/endophytic plant-fungus associations often lack nested network architecture, while those associations can vary, to some extent, in their community-scale properties along a latitudinal gradient. Overall, this study provides a basis for future studies that will examine how different types of plant-fungus associations collectively structure terrestrial ecosystems.
Rights: © The Author(s). 2018. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/235716
DOI(Published Version): 10.1186/s12870-018-1500-5
PubMed ID: 30463525
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