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Title: The neural network for tool-related cognition: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of 70 neuroimaging contrasts
Authors: Ishibashi, Ryo
Pobric, Gorana
Saito, Satoru  kyouindb  KAKEN_id  orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0403-3606 (unconfirmed)
Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.
Author's alias: 石橋, 遼
齊藤, 智
Keywords: Tool
tool-use
action
semantic representation
meta-analysis
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Routledge
Journal title: Cognitive Neuropsychology
Volume: 33
Issue: 3-4
Start page: 241
End page: 256
Abstract: The ability to recognize and use a variety of tools is an intriguing human cognitive function. Multiple neuroimaging studies have investigated neural activations with various types of tool-related tasks. In the present paper, we reviewed tool-related neural activations reported in 70 contrasts from 56 neuroimaging studies and performed a series of activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analyses to identify tool-related cortical circuits dedicated either to general tool knowledge or to task-specific processes. The results indicate the following: (a) Common, task-general processing regions for tools are located in the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and ventral premotor cortex; and (b) task-specific regions are located in superior parietal lobule (SPL) and dorsal premotor area for imagining/executing actions with tools and in bilateral occipito-temporal cortex for recognizing/naming tools. The roles of these regions in task-general and task-specific activities are discussed with reference to evidence from neuropsychology, experimental psychology and other neuroimaging studies.
Rights: © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/Licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2433/235747
DOI(Published Version): 10.1080/02643294.2016.1188798
PubMed ID: 27362967
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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